Baby Talk Milestones

Sultan’s First Words

 

But we as mothers keep asking ourselves, when will I hear my baby’s first words? It is said that essential milestones for a baby learning to talk usually happen in the first three years of life, when a baby’s brain is rapidly developing. During that time, our babies’ speech development depends on our “baby talk” skills as well as our babies’.

When Will I Hear My Baby’s First Words?

The first “baby talk” is said to be nonverbal and happens after his/her birth. The baby may frown, cry, and jiggle to express a range of emotions and physical needs, from fear and hunger to frustration and sensory overload. Some parents learn to listen and interpret their baby’s different cries.

It is believed that each individual baby will say those magical first words at his/her own pace. As my son Sultan is about to turn 15 months this January, we are all patient and accept his speech delay, since we have 7 languages spoken in the family, hence, it may be hard for him to pick one specific language to start speaking. Meantime he is very active and already pronounces simple words like “baa-baa” and “maa-maa”.  However, it is recommended to pay close attention to baby’s milestones in speech development, and if you have any serious concerns, then talk to your pediatrician or family doctor about your concerns.

Sultan’s Talk Milestones:

  • Baby talk at 3 months. At 3 months, our baby listened to our voice, watched our face as we talked, and turned toward other voices, sounds, and music that could be heard around the home. It is said that many babies prefer a woman’s voice over a man’s. Many also prefer voices and music they heard while they were still in the womb. Sultan was not different. He still loves when I recite him “Ayat Ul Kursi”. By the end of three months, Sultan began “cooing”, it was a happy, gentle, repetitive and sing-song vocalization.
  • Baby talk at 6 months. Usually at 6 months, the baby begins babbling with different sounds. For example, my baby started with “baa-baa” or “maa-maa” a little earlier than 6 months. So each baby develops individually. By the end of the sixth or seventh month, my baby Sultan started responding to his own name, recognized some of our native languages that we speak at home, and till date he uses his tone of voice to tell us he’s happy or upset.
  • Baby talk at 9 months. By the 9th month, Sultan could already understand a few basic words like “no” and “bye-bye baby”, he even waves his hand “bye” when he leaves home for a walk or when guests are about to leave our house.
  • Baby talk at 12 months. They say most babies say a few simple words like “mama” and “dadda” by the end of 12 months, and now they know what they’re saying. Nowadays Sultan responds to, or at least understands, if not obeys, our short, one-step requests such as, “Please pass me the remote or toy”. He often obeys our requests, however, if he was scolded for misbehaving few minutes prior to our request, he will pretend like he does not see the remote or the object we requested him to bring:)
  • Baby talk at 18 months. We are quite eager to see what will be Sultan’s first phrases by this age, however, it is believed that babies at this age say up to 10 simple words and can point to people, objects, and body parts you name for them. I have already began teaching him where is his nose, hands, fingers, toes etc., and he is very well able to understand when we point at different objects, be it his toys or food etc. Sultan tries to repeat words or sounds he hears we say, like the last word in a sentence. Looking forward to his first few phrases by the time he is 18 months old.

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